demos

No Frame
No Frame

Jon Hayes recently summarized his Columbus-based band Lackluster's work in progress: "There aren't really any tracks that address issues from the point of view that someone else should have done anything differently. It's basically a look at something gone wrong, and stepping back to get a clearer idea and take personal responsibility." He's right. Check the posted version of "Liars," pulsing with compassionately persistent truth-seeking and unblinking self-awareness. The new album's completion continues; meanwhile, even Eddie Murphy's jumping reverie "Party All The Time" fits Lackluster's rocking live sets, in a typically revelatory way.

- Don Allred, U Weekly (Apr 08, 2010)

"It was great! There were trendy scenester kids dancing everywhere... seriously! I haven't seen a crowd reaction like that for a local band in a long time."

- Tim Razler, Quarantine Media (Aug 24, 2009)

"Lackluster's got a good handle on arrangements and melody, interweaving their synths and guitars in epic fashion."

- Chris DeVille, Columbus Alive

"The musical production of Lackluster is absolutely insane."

- catsask.com

"..has created something fresh, something new, something that is willing to take risks, and more often than not, succeeds in what it's trying to do."

- Tim Razler, Quarantine Media

"acoustical soulful voice reels you in for more as he has a way of delivering lyrics that are meaningful, passionate, and sexy."

- Isaac Joseph, juniorscave.com

"Lackluster is anything but his odd choice of name and mixes in Jack Johnson cosiness with Bright Eyes ability to amaze... if only we were all this gifted. "

- Owen Mckeon , www.glasswerk.co.uk

"I should have recognized the signs/The lies within our eyes.../They hide in your eyes too/But mine combine and build.../Say goodbye to the truth." Yeah, because neither one has paid their truth bill, so, "Collections come to smoke us out." Columbus-based Jon Hayes, AKA Lackluster, one-man band turned bandleader, sounds like he could be all the people in "Liars," and other original postings. Self-assertive multiplicity, and even his ruefully lyrical vocals, also smokes out a slamming cover of "Party All The Time." Live, Lackluster and his rhythm section further combine and build with samplers.

- Don Allred, U Weekly

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